Category Archives: Guns

Father of the AR15: The Legacy of Eugene Stoner

Father of the AR15:

The Legacy of Eugene Stoner

His name may not be as recognizable as the late Chris Kyle, but Eugene Stoner is the man behind the design of the AR-15. “American Sniper” Kyle’s autobiograpy and motion picture, depicted Kyle using a sniper variant of the AR-15. It all began in 1954 when Stoner, a World War II veteran, became the Chief Engineer of ArmaLite. Today, not only is the AR-15 extremely popular, AR15 accessories can be purchased separately so gun owners can create a fully customized rifle. It has become a favorite rifle for militaries, sportsmen, and preppers alike.

This infographic captures a synopsis of the proud history of the AR15 rifle:
AR15

The U.S. counterpart to Russian, Mikhail Kalashnakov, Eugene Stoner actually first invented the AR10 which was rejected by the U.S. military in favor of the M14 rifle. With the base design already down, the team at Armalite made some changes to the AR10 (the big one was changing the caliber from 7.62 X 51mm NATO to the 5.56 X 45mm NATO cartridge) and arrived at the final product of the AR15. This finalized design is what the U.S. military adopted as what most know as the M16 rifle. While at Armalite, Stoner also designed a survival rifle for the U.S. Air Force that was designated as the AR5 and was later upgraded to today’s AR7 Survival Rifle.

Stoner continued his work with firearms going on to work with well known firearm companies including Colt (who had purchased the rights to the AR15 from Armalite) and Knight’s Armament. He even co-founded the company ARES Incorporated where he had a few other successful firearm designs.

It is safe to say that while not only bringing us the AR15 platform of rifle, Eugene Stoner is an amazing contributor to the modern firearms industry, not only on the military side of things but the sporting side as well.

The Survivor’s Guide To Storing Firearms

THE SURVIVOR’S GUIDE TO STORING FIREARMS

The following post is a guest submission from Aaron. In this article, he discusses some great storage ideas for gun owners and how to properly care for these.

A gun can come in handy when caught in very tough situations. While some would likely promote the idea that guns be totally eradicated in all parts of the globe, this proposition is still only perfect for an ideal world. If everybody was following the written laws and unwritten ideals as was intended by most governments in the first place, then living in peace without the need to carry or keep a gun may be possible. Until the world is a safe haven free from criminals, then it is the right of every sane person to own a gun and protect themselves and their loved ones from the possible dangers of robbery or related incidents, and always being prepared for tougher times. To all gun owners, remember that having a firearm at home also comes with the responsibility to store these safely for the sake of everyone at home. It is understandable that you may want to keep guns in places that are easily accessible when the need arises for you to use them.

Firearm Concealment Ideas

There are a lot of ways by which you can hide your firearms without arousing suspicion from other family members or visitors. Here are some tips that might help you come up with your own idea:

1. The Prized Painting by the Wall

This one is probably one of the most used ideas as shown in many action movie films. You may have seen one too. You also might recall how the bad guy decided to crash into the hero’s home and wanted to make quick money and maybe get lucky and bring home some jewelry too? But alas! The owner of the home heard someone trying to break in and the gun stored behind the paintingwas just what he needed to take a warning shot and scare the goon away.

2. The Librarian’s Stuff

Do you have a bookshelf in your living room, bedroom or home office? Unless your visitors are bookworms and love to read books in somebody else’s home, your books would go untouched and unnoticed by anyone but you. For the old books that you no longer use, you can use the side covers, glue this in a small box and use this as a hidden gun and ammo storage compartment. Keep the box at the upper level of the bookshelf to prevent small kids from reaching it.

 

3. The Household Furniture

If you love working with carpentry and building your own furniture, then you can put your talent to good use and incorporate hidden spaces in these. Get creative. Even solid and bulky parts can be made to look like it is made of pure wood, but what most would not notice is that there may be something hidden behind the façade. The coffee table, the bed post, the arm of the chair, and even the underside of the dining table – all these could be used to store guns.

4. The Not-So-Usual Places

There are many things in your home that usually go unnoticed. The more plain these are, the better the chance that these will never be thought of as something that carries your prized guns. Examples of these are the food containers at the top of the kitchen shelf that you’ve never touched and will never probably be able to use. Other firearm safe storage places could be a hollow trophy or a wall shelf, an old violin case, inside a jacket pocket in your closet, an old boot, behind the window curtains or places that can be seen in plain sight but are not considered a usual place to hide a firearm.

Caring For Guns Prior To Storage

Remember that your guns are made of metal. With constant use and abuse, these could easily succumb to rusting. Instead of your family being protected when you needed it, a rusting gun may fail to work or end up hurting you instead. Prepper gun storage comes with being able to care for guns the right way. Here are some tips to keep your guns always in top condition.

  1. Clean guns from the inside out. Whenever your gun is used, gunpowder residue is released and this could accumulate inside your firearm. With its buildup inside your gun, this can be likened to dirt that seeps at the insides of your shoes. Just as dirt attracts unwanted bacteria and fungus in shoes, gunpowder attracts the formation of rust since this easily absorbs moisture from the air. Take note that there are many small movable parts inside your firearm and these can stick together with the presence of gunpowder.
  1. Grease is not always a good option. Steel metal windows may need constant lubrication for these to open and close easily and to prevent rusting. However, this rule is not always applicable when it comes to firearms. Many products which were specifically designed to prevent rusting in firearms are now available in the market and these only leave a protective film instead of grease.
  1. Keep guns away from moisture. The easiest way to render your gun useless is to keep this in a moist place. While keeping your gun in a movable tile in the bathroom or the kitchen sounds like a great idea, this is not doing any good for your ammo and guns. Keep your guns in a dry place and/or airtight containers.
  1. Periodically perform maintenance. Just because you have cleaned your guns before storing them is not enough reason for you to never clean them again. Even after applying a rust protective agent and keeping firearms in an ideal storage space, you still need to check these from time to time and take them apart for regular cleaning.

Additional Reminders

Take note that guns can be dangerous when used by the wrong people which includes children. For additional safe gun storage tips, keep your guns out of the sight and reach of your children until they come of age and are responsible enough to use one. If you choose to get a gun for the lady of the house to protect herself and the kids, teach her some of these tips too.

About The Author

Aaron Mulligan creates content for Gun Mate, Hunting Magazines as well as being a regular contributor for other hunting websites. His expertise has seen him camp alongside some of the greatest campers, trekkers and adventure seekers in the world – unfortunately he hasn’t cracked the Kokoda Trail. You can grab him on Google+ or via his current Twitter Profile: @Gun_Mate

The Ultimate Survival Gun!

There is an never-ending debate in the preparedness world about whether or not the ultimate survival gun exists and what it may be. Of the many theories, there seems to be a bit of a lean towards the 12 Gauge Shotgun or .22 Caliber Rifle but I think I found the ultimate survival gun!

The X-Caliber by Chiappa Firearms is a two barrel, double trigger rifle in an over/under configuration which is chambered as a smooth bore 12 Gauge shotgun on top and a rifled .22 Long Rifle on bottom. The true “magic” (if you will) comes from the set of included adapters that make it the most flexible firearm available for almost any survival scenario. The 8 adapters included allow .380, 9 mm, .357 Mag/.38 Special, .40 S&W, .44 Mag, .45 ACP, .410 Gauge/.45 Colt and 20 Gauge to be fired out of the X-Caliber in addition to the primary offering of 12 Gauge and .22 Long Rifle. With a total availability of 12 different calibers, it very well could handle just about anything.

Not only is the X-Caliber capable of firing a myriad of cartridges, it is designed to be used as a survival rifle by integrating the ability to fold down to only 18.5 inches and the weight has been reduced by replacing the normal stock material with  polypropylene foam. This makes it capable of easily being transported in a backpack as part of a Bug Out Bag, Get Home Bag or other survival kit.

In addition to these features, the X-Caliber includes:

  • A space to hold 12 Gauge, .22 LR shells and cleaning kit inside of the stock.
  • Fixed optical fiber front sight and a rear sight that is adjustable for both windage and elevation to compensate for the caliber being used.
  • Three integrated picatinny rails to facilitate the mounting of optics, lights, etc.

What if you already have a 12 Gauge shotgun? No problem! The X-Caliber adapter set is available for purchase separately for use with a smooth bore 12 Gauge shotgun. I do feel that the use of these adapters will likely impact accuracy, especially at farther distances. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price for the X-Caliber rifle with complete insert set is $750 while the X-Caliber insert set alone is $450. There are cheaper firearms out there but not another one that I know of that can shoot such a variety of calibers.

What would your ultimate survival gun be?

Finding a First Gun for the Lady in Your Life

The following is a guest post submission from Milton Zane about some of the areas that should be considered when looking for a first gun for the lady in your life. While the points are geared towards helping a spouse, girlfriend, family member, or loved one find a firearm that is a good fit for them, the same points could be considered when finding a gun for yourself, or anyone for that matter.

How to Find the Perfect First Gun for the Lady in Your Life

Americans are carrying handguns in record numbers, partly because of concern for personal safety and partly as a display of a constitutional right that is being threatened. In 2011, Gallup found that 23% of women owned guns, up from just 13% in 2005. As many as 43% of women report having access to a firearm and many more have expressed interest in learning more.

While protection is one reason for owning a firearm, it is hardly the only reason. Though gun sports have traditionally been dominated by men, more and more women are beginning to take part in recreation that involves firearms. If you are looking to purchase a firearm, for a woman in your life, then consider the following tips while shopping to ensure that you get one she will like.

Picture Credit: En.Bloguru.com
Price

Like any item you purchase, quality can make a huge difference in levels of enjoyment and satisfaction. A good handgun will cost around $500, while a shotgun or rifle may cost substantially more. Purchasing a cheap firearm ensures that it will never be used and that the person you give it to will be put off of guns for a long time to come. Buy a high quality, well-designed firearm to ensure hours of pleasant, engaging use.

Ammunition and Caliber

In a similar vein to the above point regarding the price of the firearm, consider the price of ammunition. In this case, you want ammunition to be affordable so that the gun can actually be used. So, consider things like the 9 mm over the .45 because of the difference in the price of ammunition. The equation is simple; buy an expensive, quality gun that uses affordable ammunition. In general, the smaller the caliber, the cheaper the ammunition. As an added benefit, smaller caliber firearms tend to have less recoil (kick), which makes for more appealing to use.

Try It

You may want the firearm to be a surprise, but the person who is going to use the gun really needs to hold it to make sure that it fits her hand, is easy to manipulate, and is comfortable in terms of weight. If you have to be creative, tell her that you are shopping for yourself, but get her involved by asking for her opinion. Listen carefully to the things she tells you and then buy the gun that she likes best. Once you have found the firearm, you can always purchase it online from a site like Guns America to save a little money.

Size

If this is a firearm that is going to be carried to more than just the shooting range, then you need to consider how she will tote it around. Will it be in a holster or will it be in a handbag? Where the gun is carried will help you decide how large and how heavy it can be. In general, purses can only handle smaller guns while you can get away with a larger gun if it is to be carried in a holster.

Believe

No matter how you wrangle with the tips above, don’t forget the most important point of all, which is to buy a brand you believe in. If you know that a certain manufacturer makes a top notch firearm, then don’t be afraid to violate one or two of the guidelines above to get what you know will work. This gun is something that is likely to last a long time, so make the effort to get one that is worth keeping.

Milton Zane is passionate about firearms. He enjoys writing about different types of guns, safety, and proper care.

.22LR: Truth & Myth

.22LR: Truth & Myth

It’s easy for the prepper survivalist to get lost in the endless confusion, attempting to discern between wants and needs. Is it a small knife or big blade? Do you carry a handgun or a rifle? However, it is even more important to determine the difference between what is a trend…and what will actually work in the field. In most cases, the right answer is: it depends on the situation.

The .22 Long Rifle rim-fire cartridge has had an excellent run, and built a legendary reputation, since its inception in 1887. The cartridge itself has been enveloped in tales of unfathomable deeds in the backwoods, taking everything from grizzlies (usually shot in the eye) and field mice (usually shot from the hip). Though, these are stories often repeated by old frontiersmen and armchair online forum dwellers alike. Anecdotal ‘evidence’ might suggest that the .22LR is the ‘do-all’ round, but is this actually true? Is it the perfect survivalist cartridge, providing enough kill power on small game while limiting damage to the meat, yet delivering just enough punishment in a ‘tactical situation’?

It is important to explore what the round can do, and more importantly, what it cannot do. All too often, we envision our own survival situations, handling our trusty Ruger 10/22, dispatching small game by the bundles and carrying home a sack of deceased critters as the sun begins to set, right on time for dinner. We even imagine ourselves bagging a whitetail, because we got a ‘lucky shot between the eyes’. If this is truth, then the .22LR should be the only rifle for the survivalist, but my gut tells me, this is probably not a reasonable expectation of the old cartridge – and you might want to pack other ways of procuring meat sources.

The Two-Fold Achilles Heel of the .22 Long Rifle

I’ve often heard it said, “If you poke enough holes in something, it’ll go down.” Usually, this is said by avid .22LR advocates, defending their ancient heritage or new purchase. While this statement does carry some obvious truth, many experienced outdoorsmen, and especially those who study ballistics might disagree on grounds of practicality.

One of the most crucial aspects of a round’s utility has to do with the hydrostatic shock factor.  ‘Hydrostatic shock’ is defined as…

The observation that a penetrating projectile can produce remote wounding and incapacitating effects in living targets, in addition to local effects in tissue caused by direct impact, through a hydraulic effect in liquid-filled tissues.

Referencing an article written by Dave Henderson, it takes a velocity of at least 2,000fps in order to deliver the death-dealing power necessary for an incapacitating strike on the shooter’s target. Essentially, you want the round to hit the target (four-legged critter or two-legged crazy) and make them cease whatever activity they were previously doing, whether grazing, climbing, or pointing a weapon in your direction.

The hottest of hunting .22LR loads are cruising along at 1,280fps at the muzzle. If the shooter wants to reach out to 100 yards, that velocity drops to 1,015fps, about half of what’s needed to achieve the same hydrostatic shock factor that most center-fire hunting rounds can deliver. Simply put, there’s just not enough ‘punch’ to bag that whitetail with a .22LR, likely causing either an agonizing drawn out death by hours of bleeding, or months of injury and subsequent starvation to the noble beast (hence, the legality issue in almost every state).

Also, a slower round is going to have accuracy issues. Of course, we’ve heard of Bob Munden-types lobbing a .22LR, 400 yards into a bowling pin – but let’s face it, 99% of us aren’t that good from a bench, much less in the field. Even with those 1,280fps zingers, you’ve still got a drop of 3.5” at 100 yards, and that’s without having to compensate for wind. With only 37 grains, moving at that velocity, a slight breeze would ruin the shot.

Either way, the survivalist does not harvest the deer, coyote, or raccoon, wastes a round, and in certain scenarios, risked identifying his or her position from the report of the shot.

Also, one more fatal flaw commonly associated with the .22LR has to do with it’s questionable reliability. Indeed, no backwoodsman would ever consider a Savage bolt-action or a Ruger 10/22 as an unreliable rifle. These rifles have offered astounding performance for decades; however, reliability is also heavily dependent on the quality of the rounds being fed. Unfortunately, rim-fire cartridges are disproportionately handicapped in this respect, compared to their center-fire counterparts. Primers, insufficient pressure, and quality control are usually the culprits.

If you’re shooting a rim-fire cartridge and the bad guy in your sights is shooting a center-fire cartridge, pray you didn’t get a rough batch from the factory.

Why You Still Need a .22LR

Nevertheless, while the .22LR might have its drawbacks, it’s important for us to remind ourselves that we are mistaken if we attempt to identify a ‘do-all’ round. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach, especially in terms of firearms. All cartridges have their strengths and weaknesses, and the .22LR is no exception.

And, the .22LR does have strengths…lots and lots of strengths.

Talk to any .22LR owner and they will laugh at you after telling them how much you spent on ammunition for your centerfire. This is perhaps one of the most obvious strengths of the old cartridge. Being able to spend less than $20 on a 500-round ‘brick’ of ammo is what has .22LR lovers shooting, while everyone else on the firing line has shot their budget and gone home.

Of course, from the survivalist’s perspective, being able to carry 1,000 rounds of any kind of ammo is a lovely proposition. A fifth of that in .308 is still tediously heavy but in .22LR, carrying that amount of ammunition is a breeze. The .22LR is a tiny round without much brass, lead, or powder.

Do you remember how I said that the .22LR is inferior to most hunting cartridges because of it’s low velocity? The interesting part is the fact that the .22LR is superior to other hunting cartridges…because of its low velocity. Without the presence of hydrostatic shock, meat does not get obliterated upon penetration. Thus, you can take rabbit all day long, preserving the meet with a .22LR, whereas a .223 would leave nothing but a mangled attempt at acquiring a meal.

Simply put, the .22LR is the best selling ammunition on the globe for good reason. Brad Zozak, from TruthAboutGuns, calls the Ruger 10/22, “the single most popular firearm of all time.” In a SHTF scenario, you might not be able to replace the stock on your Springfield M1A – but check any abandoned farmhouse, and you’ll most likely find replacement parts for your 10/22 (and probably .22LR rounds to go with it).

The Purpose of the .22LR

Overall, the .22LR should not be expected to perform the functions of other, better-suited rifles. At the same time, one should also not expect a .30-06 to effectively take and preserve the meat off small game – arguably the type of game you’d want to harvest in the first place.

However, the survivalist that hopes to sling a Ruger 10/22, trek through the woods, and be sustained on that alone is unfortunately mistaken. It takes the ability to hunt big game to survive (both for the nutritional value and also for the other resources that can be procured from the beast), meaning that a centerfire-hunting rifle is absolutely crucial over the long haul.

If the survivalist hopes to remain true to the craft (and not kick the bucket in the backwoods), it takes more than just the possession of a .22LR rifle. It takes the ability to trap and forage for wild edibles in order to live in somewhat of a comfortable state of self-reliance. One needs to intelligently pack for survival scenarios. From carrying knives to packing a fire starter, everything needs to be picked thoughtfully. The legendary frontiersmen of the 19th and 20th centuries relied more on their survival kits than they did on their rifles, and for good reason.

The .22LR is a fantastic survival cartridge, but it shouldn’t be your only option for filling your game bag and your gut. Stay safe, keep your guns ready, knives sharp, and never forget to memorize the basics of preparedness.

About the Author – Usman is a writer, outdoor enthusiast, technology lover, and knife collector.